Ardenwood Demo font details

The Ardenwood Demo font was uploaded to eFonts.co on 15th November 2013 and has been downloaded 76 times. The font can be downloaded free of charge with a license of - Free for Personal Use. The Ardenwood Demo font is currently located in the Initial Caps, Old English category. Below you'll be able to view information about the Ardenwood Demo font, such as: character map, author notes and any relevant copyright information. The author of this font ( The Scriptorium ) has uploaded 73 fonts, view them all here.


Ardenwood Demo by The Scriptorium
Free for Personal Use Uploaded: 15 November 2013 Download Font 76 downloads

Character Map

character map

Author Notes

SCRIPTORIUM FONT LIBRARY MINI-MANUALEXTRACTION	If you receive your fonts on CD, ignore this section.  If yougot your fonts on floppy or through the internet the files will bestuffed in a single archive file using Stuffit for the Macintoshor compressed with PKunZip for the PC. To extract Stuffitarchives, just click on them and they will unstuff to the destination youspecify.  To extract PKZip archives you will need a copy of PKunZip.  Ifyou don't have a current copy you can obtain one from any online serviceor from our website at http://www.ragnarokpress.com/scriptorium.INSTALLATION	Macintosh: If you are using System 7 all you need to do is drop thefonts you wish to use on your system folder and they will automatically beplaced in the Font folder.  If you are using an older version of the systemsoftware you will need to drop the fonts on the system file itself.  Beforeinstalling fonts determine whether you wish to use True Type or Postscript.For Postscript install the .bmap file and the file with no suffix.  ForTrutype just install the .suit file.  Do not install both Postscript andTruetype unless you rename one of the suitcases so that they will notconflict.        MS DOS: Where you install the fonts will depend on the program youare using.  Consult your manual for more information.	Windows: Click on the Control Panel icon.  In the Control Panelclick on the Fonts icon.  Select add fonts.  In some cases you may need to alsoadd the fonts specifically to the programs you are using.  Consult theprogram manual for more information.TROUBLESHOOTING	Font Appears as Boxes (Macintosh): First, check to make sure thatnone of the characters display properly.  Some calligraphic, display anddecorative initials fonts may have only upper or lower case characters, butnot both. This is not a defect, but a traditional characteristic of thosetypes of alphabets. If it's not one of these obvious things and the problempersists, it is an indication that the font is too complex forthe memory configuration which you are currently using.  This is mostlikely to happen when using the Postscript versions under system 6.X, on a68000 Macintosh, or on a system with less than 4 megabytes of systemmemory.  However, with more complex fonts it can occur with more powerfulsystems.  It can also be the result of programs which have poor memorymanagement.  In some cases assigning additional memory to the applicationyou are using can solve this problem, but the more complex the font is, themore memory it demands. We have never encountered any problems on anysystems which have a 68030 or better processor and at least 8 megabytes ofmemory, but some of the newer Macintoshes, although nominally equivalent toan SE/30 or better, have inexplicably poor memory management.  In the worstcase scenario your system just may not be able to run some of the mostcomplex fonts without some sort of hardware or software upgrade.	Font Not Visible on Screen or Appears Only in Small Point Sizes(PC): This is essentially the same problem as the one noted above on theMacintosh. It means that your system is not powerful enough to handle thenumber of points in the font you're trying to use.  This problem isparticularly troublesome with PCs running Windows, but it will be fixedwith the release of Windows95. This generally occurs with art anddecorative initials fonts, but the limitations on the PC are even moresevere than on the Macintosh, so on older systems it may occur with lesscomplex fonts as well.  It is less likely to happen with TrueType fontsthan with Postscript, and can only be dealt with by getting a more powerfulPC.  Generally a 486 or better with at least 8 megabytes of memory shouldhave no problems. If you cannot upgrade your hardware you may find that youcan still use the more complex fonts in a limited context.  Generally youshould be able to use smaller point sizes with multiple characters, orprint one or two individual characters in larger point sizes, even if theydon't appear on the screen.	Font Appears Not to Have Apostrophes: This is a quirk of certainword processing programs which can be configured to use a non-standardapostrophe character in place of the standard apostrophe included in allour fonts. Some programs, including Microsoft Word may come configured touse the alternative apostrophes.  Consult your manual to reconfigure thesoftware, or for the key combination necessary to access the correctapostrophe.	Font Prints with Rays or Lines on it: Generally a problem withPostscript versions of the most complex fonts and certain art or fontsampling programs.  Not much you can do except try a different program.	Font Prints Only Some Lines of Some Characters (PC): This isanother function of PCs with insufficient memory, generally only with thosefonts with many overlapping points, particularly decorative initials.  Thismay be fixable by changing the settings on your printer (see printermanual).  Alternatively it should not be a problem if you print only a fewcharacters at a time, which is normal use for this type of font anyway.FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONSQ: How do I install fonts on my Macintosh?A: If you are using System 7 or later all you need to do is drop thefonts you wish to use on your system folder and they will automatically beplaced in the Font folder.  If you are using an older version of the systemsoftware you will need to drop the fonts on the system file itself.  Beforeinstalling fonts determine whether you wish to use True Type or Postscript.For Postscript install the .bmap file and the file with no suffix.  ForTrutype just install the .suit file.  Do not install both Postscript andTruetype unless you rename one of the suitcases so that they will notconflict.Q: How do I install fonts on my PC?A: If you are using Windows 3.1 or Windows 95, click on the Fonts ControlPanel icon.  Click on the Add button.  At this point you may need to givethe computer the proper path to find the fonts on a floppy or CD orwherever you've stored them on your hard drive.  Alternatively you may haveto use the File menu in the Fonts Control Panel, which has Install Font asan option.  In some cases you may need to also add the fonts specificallyto the programs you are using.  Consult the program manual for moreinformation.  In MS DOS where you install the fonts will depend on theprogram you are using.  Consult the program's manual for more information.Q: What's the difference between TrueType and Postscript fonts?A: Postscript fonts consist of two files, a screen font and a printer font.As it is used today it is a format developed by Adobe and adopted by otherfont foundries.  It is used primarily by high-end imagesetters who preferit because the relationship between screen image and printed output is more reliable.  In most cases you need Adobe Type Manager to use Postscriptfonts effectively.  TrueType fonts consist of a single file which containsboth the screen and printer versions of the font.  It is a format developedjointly by Apple and Microsoft as an alternative to Postscript.  TrueTypeis easier to use, and modern TrueType fonts are usually equal in qualityof output to Postscript fonts, but by tradition some conservative servicebureaus and printers are reluctant to work with TrueType fonts.Q: How do I access characters which aren't part of the standard keyboard?A: On the Mac you may be able to access many of these special charactersby combining the option key with the regular keys.  To find out how todo this use the Keycaps Desk Accessory.  In Windows you will probablyaccess these characters with the Alt key and a numerical sequence.  To see a listing of alternate characters and get the codes, use the CharacterMap accessory in the Program Manager.Q: Why do the characters in my font print as boxes?A: First check to make sure that all the characters are printing as boxes.  Some fonts only have upper or lower case characters because theyare based on historic calligraphy which only had one form for each letter.This is not a defect, but a traditional characteristic of thosetypes of alphabets. If it's not one of these obvious things and the problempersists, it is an indication that the font is too complex forthe memory configuration which you are currently using.  This is mostlikely to happen when using the Postscript versions under system 6.X on a68000 Macintosh, or on a system with less than 4 megabytes of systemmemory.  However, with more complex fonts it can occur with more powerfulsystems.  It can also be the result of programs which have poor memorymanagement.  In some cases assigning additional memory to the applicationyou are using can solve this problem, but the more complex the font is, themore memory it demands. We have never encountered any problems on anysystems which have a 68030 or better processor and at least 8 megabytes ofmemory, but some of the newer Macintoshes, although nominally equivalent toan SE/30 or better, have inexplicably poor memory management.  In the worstcase scenario your system just may not be able to run some of the mostcomplex fonts without some sort of hardware or software upgrade.Q: Why do characters in my font vanish at larger point sizes?A: This is essentially the same problem as the one noted above on theMacintosh. It means that your system is not powerful enough to handle thenumber of points in the font you're trying to use.  This problem isparticularly troublesome with PCs running Windows 3.X, but is more orless fixed in Windows95. This generally occurs with art anddecorative initials fonts, but the limitations on the PC are even moresevere than on the Macintosh, so on older systems it may occur with lesscomplex fonts as well.  It is less likely to happen with TrueType fontsthan with Postscript, and can only be fixed by upgrading to Windows95 andpossibly getting more memory as well.  You may find that youcan still use the more complex fonts in a limited context.  Generally youshould be able to use smaller point sizes with multiple characters, orprint one or two individual characters in larger point sizes, even if theydon't appear on the screen.Q: Sometimes Font Smoothing makes my fonts look strange. Should I use it?A: Windows95 offers a feature for printing called Font Smoothing,which may lead you to wonder if your fonts aren't smoothe enough.  The factis that they are just fineQ: Why are there no apostrophes or quotation marks in my font?A: Some programs use a feature called 'smart quotes' which looks for alternative versions of these symbols.  Consult your manual to reconfigure thesoftware to turn off smart quotes, or for the key combination necessary to access the correctapostrophe.Q: What are Minuscule and Majuscule letters?A: These are calligraphic terms referring to the two main styles of character.They literally mean small and large, but in modern usage minuscule meanslower case characters and majuscule means upper case characters.  However,in some calligraphy, particularly Uncial styles, the minuscule mayonly be a smaller, simpler variation of the majuscule form.Q: What is the difference between Cursive, Script and Italic?A: Cursive means refers to a 'running' hand in calligraphic lettering,where all of the characters are connected and flow together.  Traditionallythis differentiates it from Uncial lettering which consists of distinctcharacters. Script means any type which is designed to resemblehandwriting.  Italic refers to the slanted style of type introduced byAldus Manutius in the 17th century and in general to any slanted or skewed font.  So, if a font is slanted it's italic, if the characters areconnected it's cursive, and if it does so in a way which simulateshandwriting, it is script.Q: What is the difference between Black Letter, Gothic and Old English?A: There really isn't any.  All of the terms refer to early type stylesbased on the calligraphic style generally referred to as Quadrata.Black Letter is a general term for these styles.  Gothic refers specificallyto modern type used as the standard for text in Germany before World War I.Old English is an Anglo-American term for these same styles developed todivorce them from the German associations.Q: What does it mean when a font is called Antiqua, Old Style or Archaic?A: All of these terms basically indicate that the font wasdesigned to have the characteristics of early printed type.  Thesecharacteristics usually includecapital letters which are considerably larger and bolder in relation to thelower case letters than is the case with more modern type, and some unusualletter forms.Q: A font I bought doesn't have a 'j', 'u', or 'w', or these characters look funny.  Why?A: A lot of our fonts are based on historical calligraphy orantique type designs.  In the middle ages and the ancient world there wereno letters for 'j', 'u' or 'w'.  These letters are variations of 'i' and 'v'respectively and were developed in the last few hundred years.  In cases wherea font is based on historical lettering we may substitute the appropriatecharacter for those which weren't used at that time, so you get 'i' for 'j' and'v' for 'u' or 'w'.  With very complex fonts like decorative intiials wemay leave those characters out alltogether.  In some cases we include transitionalforms, such as the older style of 'w' which looks like a 'n' and a 'u' or 'v'joined together.  In some cases where it seems appropriate we will createcompatible versions of these modern characters and add them.ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE	If you need help, feel free to contact us through our email address at graball@ccsi.com, or come to our website for specialcustomer support at http://www.ragnarokpress.com/scriptorium

Font

Designer Name: The Scriptorium
License: Free for Personal Use

Font Information

Copyright Notice Ardenwood Demo v.1.0  Copyright 2001, Dave Nalle  Scriptorium Fonts. To register and get the full version go to http://www.fontcraft.com
Font Family Name Ardenwood Demo
Font Subfamily Name Regular
Unique Font Identifier Macromedia Fontographer 4.1.4 Ardenwood Demo
Full Font Name Ardenwood Demo
Version Macromedia Fontographer 4.1.4 12/30/01
Postscript Name ArdenwoodDemo
Number of Glyphs 87 - View Complete Character Map

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